Walter Williams Quote On Poverty In The USA

“Poverty is not static for people willing to work. A University of Michigan study shows that only 5 percent of those in the bottom fifth of the income distribution in 1975 remained there in 1991. What happened to them? They moved up to the top three-fifths of the income distribution—middle class or higher. Moreover, three out of 10 of the lowest income earners in 1975 moved all the way into the top fifth of income earners by 1991. Those who were poor in 1975 had an inflation-adjusted average income gain of $27,745 by 1991. Those workers who were in the top fifth of income earners in 1975 were better off in 1991 by an average of only $4,354. The bottom line is, the richer are getting richer and the poor are getting richer. Poverty in the United States, in an absolute sense, has virtually disappeared. Today, there’s nothing remotely resembling poverty of yesteryear. However, if poverty is defined in the relative sense, the lowest fifth of income-earners, ‘poverty’ will always be with us. No matter how poverty is defined, if I were an unborn spirit, condemned to a life of poverty, but God allowed me to choose which nation I wanted to be poor in, I’d choose the United States. Our poor must be the envy of the world’s poor.”

Walter Williams

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One Response to Walter Williams Quote On Poverty In The USA

  1. However, if poverty is defined in the relative sense, the lowest fifth of income-earners, ‘poverty’ will always be with us.

    How true! People have pride, and relative standing can be just as important to them as absolute standing.

    It’s hard to gauge “real” poverty compared to “statistical” poverty, but it doesn’t seem like anyone tries real hard to figure it out.

    Like

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