A Review of Radical Together by David Platt

Radical Together by David Platt is a continuation of Platt’s previous book Radical.  Radical focused on personal transformation while Radical Together seems to focus on corporate change of a local congregation.  Overall, I think this is a good read and I can recommend it to everyone without reservation.  The church needs to refocused from time to time and this book will help to do that.

The book is well written and effectively communicates Platt’s vision for his church and for all Christian churches to be radically shifted to a foreign missions focus.  I agree with Platt in that foreign missions are important but I don’t know if I would go as far as he suggests.  Certainly, when God calls his people to a task they should whole-heartedly obey but I am not sure that every Christian is called to be this “radical”.  Platt does say that this transformation should not be at the expense of other functions and ministries of the church locally but in my opinion the tone of his book does not seem to back up this statement.  It may be that I am reading it incorrectly.

Radical Together will serve the purpose of bringing foreign missions back into the focus and thoughts of a local congregation that has not had a proper emphasis on them.  The emotions it creates could easily cause people to jump in too quickly though.  Much prayer and counseling should be done before any radical decisions are made.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Multnomah Publishers as part of their Blogging for Books review program. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

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Marching Orders for Christians…..

If you are content with the state of Christianity in the United States today then this book (Radical:  Taking Back Your Faith From The American Dream) is not for you.  David Platt examines the implementation of the American Dream into our churches that has occurred over the last couple decades and compares it to biblical Christianity.

Platt begins by giving a biblical picture of who Jesus is.  He follows this up with a biblical explanation of what the true Gospel is.  This is as it should be because this is the foundation of all that we are and do as Christians.  He then identifies and challenges many of the aspects that have come to define what a successful church and Christian are in our current society.  Movements such as the prosperity gospel and the seeker-sensitive church model are not mentioned by name but are taken to task and their reliance in their own abilities is proven to be non-biblical.  Waste and opulence in the church and the individual Christian’s life is contrasted with the want of the poor around the world.  Christians are challenged to change the way they think and they way they live out their faith.  Platt shows the biblical model of evangelism and discipleship.  God’s word is spread God’s people meeting the needs of those around then and teaching them all that they have been taught.  It involves God’s people going into the places where the poor are.  Our modern methods often involve trying to get the poor to come to us.  Platt finishes the book by challenging the readers to take up his radical challenge for one year.  He promises that if the challenge is accepted and completed it will change the life of the person taking it.  The challenge consists of five parts:  pray for the whole world for one year, read the Bible completely in one year, sacrifice your money for a specific purpose, spend time in another context, and commit to multiplying the community of believers.

This book was definitely a convicting read.  It should make every Christian examine how he currently lives out his faith and when not in agreement with the Bible to make appropriate changes.  This process should also drive people back to God and a dependence on Him for all that He has given us to do.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Multomah Publishers as part of their Blogging for Books review program. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”